BOOKS - Ditch Medicine: Advanced Field Procedures For Emergencies, by Hugh Coffee

Ditch Medicine
Ditch Medicine

This Book Blew Rmabo's Mind!

Whether it's a war zone or a civil disaster area, traumatic injuries often occur in remote, unsanitary locations. Coffee’s book explains advanced field procedures for small wound repair, care of the infected wound, IV therapy, pain control, amputations, treatment of burns, airway procedures and more.

Hugh Coffee is a professional paramedic with extensive experience administering emergency medicine in Third World and battlefield environments. Coffee’s experience in Third World and austere environment medical procedures include improvising medical equipment from available materials and performing disaster-medicine procedures under primitive conditions.

Coffee's book is in use by many SF medics and other folks who often go in harm’s way. Coffee gets right to the bottom line in dealing with the subject of field trauma first aid and "meatball surgery." He learned it the hard way during the guerrilla war in Guatemala -- patching up troops on hilltops where no doctor would go.

I may be biased as he's Hugh "Doc" Coffee is a good friend and I was on a medical team in Kenya, Uganda (during an Ebola outbreak) and the southern Sudan (Sudanese guerrilla war) with him, but anyone who is a combat medic or who may need to perform first aid in the third world needs to read this book. I personally watched Doc Coffee revamp and supply a surgical ward in a Sudanese Rehabilitation and Relief Association field hospital near the frontlines.

Coffee is a fount of knowledge on the subject of improvised medical and surgical techniques and imparts it clearly and concisely to the reader. Ditch Medicine can be found on many survivalist and prepper resource lists and is a recommended addition to the bookshelf of any first-responder, EMT, etc., who could possibly see themselves forced to operate, literally, beyond their training and experience in an emergency.

This book is an invaluable resource on emergency techniques for those with previous medical training (EMT thru General Practitioner). Hugh also has a video series available from Paladin Press.

Click Here to buy Ditch Medicine: Advanced Field Procedures For Emergencies on Amazon.com >>>

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ~Rob Krott Foreign Correspondent

Rob-Krott
Rob-Krott

Rob is a former US Army Officer who has traveled to over 70 countries and worked with several foreign Military’s. Rob is also the author of Save the Last Bullet for Yourself: A Soldier of Fortune in the Balkans and Somalia, a war memoir of the Balkans and Somalia.

MOVIES: Tomorrow When the War Began - The Australian Red Dawn

Tomorrow-When-the-War-Began
Tomorrow-When-the-War-Began

So I was browsing the movies at the local hajji shop here in Baghdad when I ran across an Australian flick called “Tomorrow When The War Began”. Considering the rather thin choices [it was a draw between that and another poorly dubbed Steven Seagal flick] I went ahead and snapped it up. Luckily it turned out to be a pretty damn good flick.

Tomorrow When the War Began is a pretty loyal big screen version of the immensely popular [in Australia] book of the same name written by John Marsden [it is actually a series of books]. The movie is basically a “foreign army invades” story told from the eyes of a group of teenagers.

Now you are probably thinking the same think I thought when I read the description, Red Dawn. And while there are many similarities between Tomorrow When the War Began and Red Dawn there are enough differences to make this still entertaining and worth watching.

The movie starts off with a group of teenagers going on a camping trip in the Australian Bush while unbeknownst to them [despite tons of military aircraft flying over them every night in the outback] a mysterious foreign military has began its invasion of Australia. When returning to town they discover that their families are missing and no one is to be found.

Eventually they realize an unnamed foreign army has launched a massive invasion of Australia and rounded all civilians up and placed them in concentration camps. At first they do the usual looking for their families and scavenging for food but eventually they are drawn into defending themselves against the black clad occupying soldiers.

China
China

After much debate they decide to take up a more offensive position and hash up a plan to attack a major supply route. I don’t want to ruin the movie for anyone here that has not seen it so I won’t go any further but that is the gist of it.

The ‘mysterious’ invading foreign army is never identified at all during the movie, that sort of stuff usually annoys me in movies but they were never named in the book either. The author felt that “who” it wasn’t really important because the story was about the group of teenagers and how they survive and change and not about the ‘who’s”. Because the filmmaker was being loyal to the author I let it slide but it still annoyed me a little.

It is pretty damn obvious to everyone but the blind it is the Red Chinese [or every Asian guy from Hamas] invading. Besides the gay ass ninja uniforms they are wearing the bad guys have some pretty cool dune buggies and play the part of an “evil” invading force without being stereotypically heartless.

The only time they mention a reason behind the invasion is a passing blurb about “the diminishing supply of the world’s natural resources” [sounds eerily familiar doesn’t it].

My favorite line in the movie is when one of the teenage kids says “We had done nothing to earn our freedom” when referring to their old lives and the guerilla war that now lay ahead of them.

Basically the flick starts off somewhat slow like a teenage coming of age movie for about the first 20 to 30 min and then heats up in the middle finishes off with a pretty dramatic open ended conclusion. To put it simply it is basically the first 1 and ½ acts in Red Dawn, with the sequels to follow sometime later this year.

If you liked Red Dawn [and we all know only Commies and Crossdressers don’t love that flick] then you will definitely enjoy Tomorrow When the War Began. After watching it I went ahead and picked up the whole book series and I am looking forward to the sequels.

8.99 Tomorrow, When the War Began (The Book):

Tomorrow, When the War Began (The Book)

21.34 Tomorrow, When the War Began (Blu Ray):

Tomorrow When the War Began [Blu-ray]

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~James G Founder - Editor in Chief

James G is a Veteran Civilian Contractor who has worked in the Middle East and Southeast Asia for way too long; he has traveled to over 50 countries chasing fortune and glory. He spends his off time in Indonesia and Virginia getting drunk, shooting guns, writing poorly written articles and Buying Way Too Many Movies at the Hajji Shop. James G. on FACEBOOK

BOOKS: "And the Rain Came Down" by S. A. Bailey

And-the-Rain-Came-Down-by-S.-A.-Bailey
And-the-Rain-Came-Down-by-S.-A.-Bailey

They say that back in the day a viable defense for a charge of manslaughter was “He needed killing.”  This, no doubt, was a very popular state of affairs in East Texas, the setting of Seth Anderson Bailey’s writing debut.

Bailey, a wounded Iraq War veteran was formerly a 82nd Airborne Division LRSD “Lurp”(Long Range Surveillance Detachment) . Likewise, his protagonist, Jedediah Shaw, is a former paratrooper and an Iraq War veteran with his own rucksack full of demons.

Shaw returns to the small East Texas town he calls home and an oft times tumultuous relationship with Abigail, the girl he previously left behind to go off and fight “his” war. But, like a lot of returning vets have realized, it was easier carrying an M-4 and door kicking in Baghdad than it is returning  to “normal” life and handling the everyday demands of civilian life as a husband and a college student.

Despite heartfelt promises he made himself in the desert , or maybe  because of them, he finds himself leading a life of quiet desperation, working as muscle for a local bondsman.

Running down bail jumpers doesn’t quite pay the bills though and he soon finds himself mired by debt and looking for a way out. And of course someone makes him an offer.  Good money for a simple task, or so he tells himself.  The evil-doing rich scion of a local dynasty contacts Jeb. He wants his old high school classmate to find his sister and return her home.

She is mixed up with a bad crowd and that spins Jeb even deeper into trouble.  Meth deals, automatic weapons, brawls, revenge, and gun play decorate a good solid plot.  And to make it interesting, he has friends. The kind you can depend upon for an extra drop gun, $500 cash, and the keys to a car at three in the morning … Or the kind who will loan you the gun, the car, and a shovel.

And then say, ‘what the hell,’ and leave a warm bed with a good woman to go help you bury the bodies. Who of us who have spent time in the military and especially in some godforsaken war zone don’t have those kinds of friends? And that’s where Bailey finds common ground with his readership, evoking the rugged individualism, sense of personal responsibility for one’s actions,  and the “take care of business” ideal that was once so common in America.

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S.-A.-Bailey
S.-A.-Bailey

In recommending this first novel to several friends I make the same remark I’ve made in recommending James Crumley, James Lee Burke, and Cormac McCarthy:  “He does violence well.”

And the similarities and influences don’t end there. Like both Burke and Crumley, Bailey litters his story with the flotsam of humanity – dissolute characters most normally found in the settings of Burke’s  Bayou Teche, Louisiana and Crumley’s Merriweather, Montana .

Like Crumley’s  protagonists ,  Bailey’s anti-hero is, to be blunt, a drunk and a drug binger.  He’s also a man with more than a passing familiarity with firearms and mortal combat.  And he’s a war vet. All themes found in the works of Burke and Crumley.

But Bailey’s work is no mere imitation. Yes, homage perhaps, but this shining new talent from East Texas definitely has an original voice.  It’s like Jim Beam, a little rough around the edges and it packs a wallop going down. Don’t dilute it with water.

TEAM DVM Recommended- Buy This Book or we Will track You Down and kick You in the Nuts

And the Rain Came Down By S. A. Bailey

And The Rain Came Down at Amazon.com >>>

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~Rob Krott Foreign Correspondent

Rob-Krott
Rob-Krott

Rob is a former US Army Officer who has traveled to over 70 countries and worked with several foreign Military’s. Rob is also the author of Save the Last Bullet for Yourself: A Soldier of Fortune in the Balkans and Somalia, a war memoir of the Balkans and Somalia.

MOVIES: G.I. Joe Rise of the Cobra Review – FU

Thanks For Taking a Big Fat Dump on an American Icon for a Few Bucks Mr. Hollywood

G-I-Joe-The-Rise-of-Cobra
G-I-Joe-The-Rise-of-Cobra

After finding “The Pit” schematics from Soldier Systems I was hit by a wave of G.I. Joe nostalgia so strong I finally decided to break down and watch the G.I. Joe live action flick despite knowing it would make me sad. Now considering how huge a fan of G.I. Joe I am most people would probably think that I have already watched it.

Well, after being disappointed beyond words after watching the Transformers movies I decided to save myself the sorrow and skip the G.I. Joe Movie. Plus after I heard Channing Tatum who plays “Duke” say that he originally didn’t want to do the movie because it glorified the wars (and presumably the soldiers also) in Iraq and Afghanistan I had about zero interest in seeing that douchebag playing one of my favorite Joe characters.

Anyway, I strolled down to the local Hajji Shop here in Iraq and picked up a copy of G.I. Joe Rise of the Cobra, grabbed a chicken and dumplings MRE and hesitantly hit the play button.

A little over an hour later I felt like crying (fortunately Old School Men do not cry) or immediately burning the DVD. This monstrosity of a movie sucked balls in so many ways the internet is not near large enough for me to call out every one in this article.

But – I will go ahead and list out the main things that annoyed/made me sad/angry:

GI-JOE-UNIFORMS
GI-JOE-UNIFORMS

Apparently the writers and producers of this movie said “let’s throw away all of the character backgrounds that G.I. Joe fans love and know and just make up some simple generic characters that are not even close to the originals - Fuck the fans”

In this train-wreck of a flick:

- The Baroness was Duke’s ex-girlfriend who had been injected with mind controlling nano-machines to make her “bad”

- Scarlett's entire background consisted of a single line about her graduating college early

- Heavy Duty was a gay British dude

- Ripcord was a jet pilot/SF operator (WTF?)

- Duke had no background outside of being the former boyfriend of the Baroness (pre-evil nano machine brain control)

- Storm Shadow (the Japanese Ninja) was played by a Korean Soap Opera Star

I could go on forever about this (and don’t even get me started on Snake Eyes) but I will stop now before my brain pops out of my head.

Oh… and none of them wore anything resembling their original character uniform (except Snake Eyes and Storm Shadow, admittedly their uniforms were petty faithful to the originals). Now you may think that’s no big deal, but each individual G.I. Joe uniform was an extremely important part of each character in both the comic and the series.

For them to dress up Joes in “been used in every action movie” gay looking black vinyl ninja uniforms, urban-camo (what is it 1985 again?) and the Satan of all camos MultiCam (more on that later) was fucking stupid.

And everything else you remembered form the Comic or Series – yep, they left that out also.

Yes Sir, a big fat “Fuck You” from the writers to the fans.

UN-Peacekeepers
UN-Peacekeepers

This was the part that really made my blood boil, in the movie G.I. Joe is NOT a US military unit made up of America's finest soldiers (the back-story G.I. Joe has been using for like 50 years).

It is some sort of non-nation specific international force called “Global Integrated Joint Operating Entity = G.I.J.O.E.” that is based out of Egypt. Any mention of G.I. Joe as an American fighting unit was thrown completely out of the window.

Yep – they basically turned G.I. Joe into a United Nations peacekeeping force that is based out of a country without women's rights and has a president that is basically a dictator.

Really?

I am not one of those “everything must be American” type of guys, I enjoy military movies featuring fighting forces from around the world so don’t go thinking I am pissed because they had Brits and French guys as Joes (well, the French Joe… never mind).

But G.I. Joe is an American icon that was specifically created to be an American Soldier – the tag-line of G.I. Joe is “G.I. Joe a Real American Hero” not “G.I. Joe a Real non-specific International Multi-Nation Peacekeeping Force Hero”.

G.I. Joe is as American as Apple Pie and credit card debt, so why the hell would they want to distance G.I. Joe from being American?

Easy - Money, the studio was obviously concerned ticket sales would not be high in countries that don’t like the U.S. so they changed G.I. Joe from a “Real American Hero” to a “non-specific nation quasi-military force” so the movie would still appeal to people and markets that hate America (this is alluded to in several articles).

So that was a big fat “Fuck You” from the writers to America.

MultiCam
MultiCam

So what is the only thing the communists making this movie could have done to truly make this flick a nightmare to watch? How about an entire opening action scene where an Army unit wears MultiCam uniforms?

Why pray tell were U.S. Military soldiers operating in Eastern Europe wearing MultiCam uniforms (even at the cost of thousands of dead Kittens*)?

Well, they could not wear U.S. Army ACU’s or U.S. Flag Patches because that would make them look like the U.S. Army Soldiers they were. And you can’t show American Soldiers wearing an American Military Uniform or Patch in your movie if you want to sell tickets in countries that dislike America.

Now putting my dislike for MultiCam aside – what I don’t understand is why Crye Associates would even allow their patented Camo to be used in a movie for the purposes of making American Soldiers look less American so they can make money from people that hate America. At a minimum Crye Associates should have put a disclaimer on their website that they were in no way involved in the selection of MultiCam for the G.I. Joe movie.

I guess for some Americans their patriotism does have a price – and that price is a 7 Dinar movie ticket.

This particular “Fuck You” arrives COD from the producers, the studio and greed.

*Every time someone wears MultiCam God Kills a Kitten

Destro-looks-dumb
Destro-looks-dumb

Besides all of the above; this was just a bad movie all around. They stole ideas from other movies (Iron Man in particular), there were plot holes large enough to drive an MRAP through, continuity errors, flat and stereotypical acting, bad die jobs (Scarlett apparently goes to Supercuts for colorings) and just plain stupid shit (nano-machine mind control? Really?)

The worst part is, this could have been a great movie considering the writers and producers had tons of great material from the comic and series to work with, hell the Storm Shadow/Snake Eyes thing could have been a movie by itself.

But no, in order to cater to people who basically represent everything the Joes are against they took a big fat dump on and American icon like G.I. Joe just to make a bad movie and a few bucks.

Shame on them for making this pile of dog-shit and calling it G.I. Joe

US_flag_burning
US_flag_burning

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~James G Founder - Editor in Chief

James G is a Veteran Civilian Contractor who has worked in the Middle East and Southeast Asia for way too long; he has traveled to over 50 countries chasing fortune and glory. He spends his off time in Indonesia and Virginia getting drunk, shooting guns, writing poorly written articles and still collecting G.I. Joe figures. James G. on FACEBOOK

BOOKS: War Story

war story book cover
war story book cover

Get Some! - old school nam' style baby

Published only four years after the fall of Saigon, War Story was the first of what has become a plethora of non-fiction Vietnam War memoirs. But because of the political climate at the time of its initial publication this potential blockbuster bestseller was all but ignored by the New York publishing houses. Robin Moore's The Green Berets was such a sensation in 1965 that it inspired a John Wayne movie, and the same photo of Army Special Forces Staff Sergeant Barry Sadler graced both the book's paperback cover and Sadler's top hit record. But by the early 1970's when Morris wrote War Story, the attitude towards the Vietnam War and America's elite warriors was colored by the anti-war movement, My Lai, the bombing of Cambodia, and the media's slanted reporting on Tet. Vietnam wasn't a popular literary topic.

Morris begins his memoir with the emotionally charged details of his re-occurring nightmare, a vivid and detailed replay of the firefight in which he had his left testicle shot off and was almost killed. In the nightmare, though, he is eventually killed. He ends the book with an emotionally charged memory also. In a heart-tugging coda, Morris recounts the scene. While standing in an Army hospital, his crippled right arm hanging at his side, his useless fingers attached to a mechanical brace he watches as the sun sets and the color guard lowers the flag; and tells us that as the flag is lowered "a feeling of almost overwhelming sadness, almost grief, came over me." As Morris attempts to salute the colors with his damaged right hand he stands "crying like a baby because I couldn't do it right."

A professional soldier who began military school as an eleven-year-old, Morris joined the Army and Special Forces where he rose to the rank of major. He volunteered for three tours in Vietnam and received four Purple Hearts and four Bronze Stars among numerous other decorations before a medical discharge for wounds cut his career short.

Jim Morris is a gifted story-teller and this book should be read for his Ludwig Faistenhammer and Larry Dring war stories alone. But at its heart War Story is the tale of Jim Morris, not an examination of the Vietnam War or even the role of Special Forces. It is, admittedly, a participant's interpretation of events. He offers up a good account of what it was like to be on the ground during the Montagnard revolt, to fight for survival during the Tet Offensive in Nha Trang, and to serve in the U.S. Army's Special Forces during its hey-day in Vietnam. Summing up his Vietnam experience Morris quotes Michael Herr's Dispatches, "Vietnam was what we had instead of happy childhoods."

This is a book by a soldier who is proud of his service, an experienced and consummate warrior who without a second thought or any moral retrospection whatsoever begs God to please send him some VC to kill for his birthday. But Morris is a thinking man's warrior (he opens his book sections with quotes from the works of Carlos Castaneda) and philosophizes about other men like himself: "I think perhaps Special Forces guys and other people like them have depressed metabolisms and they have to be exposed to some sort of danger to feel normal ... before going to Nam I didn't know that everyone wasn't paralyzed by boredom all the time."

Paralyzed with boredom is the last thing you'll be while reading War Story. A literary standout amongst the burgeoning pile of popular literature on the Vietnam War, Morris' prose is oftentimes humorous, always entertaining, and never boring, self-serving, or pedantic. A good example of his dry wit is how he describes his arrival at Ta Ko to take command of the Special Forces camp where "...the Strike Force had been for two years without going home or seeing a woman. Half of them had long hair and half of them had short hair and they were all real friendly with each other. But not with Americans. Every so often somebody threw a grenade into the team house." War Story is replete with a soldier's black humor on death and killing. One of the best lines in the book is: "I won't describe the operation because it was one of the most frustrating experiences of my military career, a compendium of tactical errors and blown chances grotesque enough to break the heart of anybody who likes to kill people."

But Vietnam wasn't all fun and games for Jim Morris. The loss he suffered, besides his physical and emotional wounds, includes the deaths of comrades and close Army friends in the brutal combat which marked Special Forces operations in Vietnam. Special Forces was a close community and the death of a "green beret" meant a personal loss. He agonizes over the fate of Philippe Drouin, one of his Montagnard comrades and a leader of FULRO, the Montagnard independence movement, who was a kindred spirit and Morris' good friend. Despite the disparity of the two cultures Morris formed a deep and long lasting attachment with the Montagnards during his three tours in Vietnam and was well connected with FULRO. While on an operation with the "Yards" at the end of his third tour, he refused medical evacuation though suffering a life-threatening wound and proceeded to supervise the evacuation of his wounded Montagnards first. His dedication to the Montagnard cause provided him with his paradigm for perfect happiness. "Get involved in something that is more important to you than your own life."

Special Forces' most ardent White House supporter, President John F. Kennedy, said, "Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country." Professional SF soldiers like Morris answered that call to duty and War Story gives us a glimpse of what our country asked of some of its young men and what they gave. For some it was too much. Others, like Morris, are still measuring the cost.

Disclaimer: Morris has been a mentor to me since the early 90’s when I was a foreign correspondent for Soldier of Fortune (where he has been alternately a contributor and an editor over the past 3 decades) and wrote the forward to my book.

War Story by Jim Morris at Amazon.com >>> Around 15 Bucks

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~Rob Krott Foreign Correspondent

Rob-Krott
Rob-Krott

Rob is a former US Army Officer who has traveled to over 70 countries and worked with several foreign Military’s. Rob is also the author of Save the Last Bullet for Yourself: A Soldier of Fortune in the Balkans and Somalia, a war memoir of the Balkans and Somalia.

OLD SCHOOL MAN: Gran Torino and the 31 Old School Man Habits of Walt Kowalski

This is probably one of the greatest Old School Man flicks ever made, hell - it’s hard to go wrong when you combine Clint Eatswood and a 45. auto. I am actually surprised that Hollywood actually green-lit a movie with a main character who acts like a man, especially considering that movies with metrosexual male leads are the norm now.

BOOKS: SAVE THE LAST BULLET FOR YOURSELF

As a big fan of books about modern Mercenary, Private Military Company (PMC) and Civilian Contracting I have been quite disappointed with the rash of so called mercenary and civilian contractor books that have been released lately. That’s why reading Rob Krott’s book was a breath of fresh air amongst the poser PMC books – this book was written by someone that actually did what he wrote about.

MOVIES: The Way of the Gun

The Way of the Gun ended up becoming my all time favorite crime flick ever, it has several elements that you don’t usually see in action movies these days that makes this movie really stand out - especially if you are into “tactical” stuff. The Way of the Gun was written by Academy Award winning writer Christopher McQuarrie (for The Usual Suspects) and was the first and only movie he ever directed.

URBAN SURVIVAL – MOVIES: I Am Legend Dissected

I Am Legend Dissected
I Am Legend Dissected

Despite being a Highly educated Scientist Dr. Neville would not have lasted 10 minutes in a post-apocalyptic world

You may be wondering why I am reviewing a 3 year old movie that has been discussed on just about every survival forum out there. Well, I have a couple reasons and the main one being about 99% of the people talking about this movie on survival forums were only criticizing it and not adding any explanations or “what I would do” to the many Urban Survival FAIL!’s in it.

And don’t get me wrong, their are a ton of things to complain about in this movie from an Urban Survivalist point of view. But what I want to do in this review is not only point out the FAIL!'s, but try to explain why those mistakes were in the movie and also what I would have done in the same situation.

A Quick Primer on I am Legend: This film is loosely based on the book of the same name written by Richard Matheson. It is basically a post-apocalyptic flick where the world’s population had been virtually wiped out by a virus that has only left behind vampire like humans called the “dark seekers”.

The only uninfected (he is immune) survivor in New York is Dr. Robert Neville, a famous and wealthy Army virologist. The movie revolves around him trying to discover a cure wile attempting to avoid the dark seekers at night, while at the same time his sanity is slowly slipping due to years of isolation.

Knife
Knife

Dr. Neville Only Carries a Small Folding Knife

The Problem:

In the movie the only knife you see Dr. Neville use or carry is a benchmade automatic knife. Now pretty much anyone in either an Urban or Wilderness (Central Park is an overgrown forest in the movie) survival situation would carry a fixed blade knife.

The Explanation:

Dr. Neville may be an Army soldier but he is not a combat arms guy, he is a world famous Army scientist and a high ranking officer. It is doubtful if a famous pre-madonna Army officer had ever attended any Army wilderness survival training. He probably chose the benchmade folder because a folding pocket knife seems like a good blade choice to an untrained person.

What I would Do:

I would carry a good fixed blade knife that could do double duty as a combat knife and utility knife. My first choice would be a Marine Ka-Bar style knife with a leather sheath, not a kydex one (no more plastic factories so you have to choose stuff that lasts and is easy to repair). I may still carry a folding knife clipped to my poket for back-up, but I wouldn’t use it as my primary.

No Gear
No Gear

Dr. Neville Doesn’t Carry Extra M-4 Mags, leaves his pistol in his car and pretty much doesn’t use any tactical gear at all

The Problem:

This one sort of perplexes me, even if he did spend his entire military career in an office he would have still received some basic weapons training. And if he gets stuck outdoors after sunset he would have to shoot his way through the Dark Seekers, even an idiot could figure that it would take some solid gear and more than 30 rounds to do that.

The Explanation:

After spending 3 years all alone and doing the same thing every day complacency has set in. That combined with the obvious fact that Dr. Neville is slowly loosing his damn mind - he now just leaves his extra magazines in his car or stuffs them in the bottom of his bag.

I have actually seen this before with guys that work in guard towers in the Middle East for years. They get in the tower and throw all of their magazines, body armor and gear on the floor because it is heavy and nothing had ever happened in the past where they needed it.

What I would Do:

Hell you guys already know the answer to this one; chest harness, 12 magazines, frags, pistol and FAK (first aid kit). Shit, I would probably keep a flamethrower and a few rocket launchers at arms reach just because I could.

I would not wear body armor because I wouldn’t have to worry about other humans shooting me and the Dark Seekers don’t carry guns or knives.

car
car

Dr. Neville Drives a mustang sports car and civilian SUV when the city is filled with APC’s and armored cars

The Problem:

If he gets caught outside at night the Dark Seekers will tear a normal car or SUV apart (and that actually does happen to him). In New York City there are dozens of agency’s and private citizens that used armored SUV’s (Secret Service, DSS, NYPD, Gangster Rappers, and so on). And that’s not even counting all of the armored military hummers and APC’s abandoned around the city.

The Explanation:

Well, in the movie he only gets caught outside after dark twice, one time in a snare (something that has never happened before) and the other time he did it on purpose. He also keeps a religious like schedule when it comes to heading back home way before dark. So this is a combination of him never accidently being caught outside after dark and complacency again. He probably just felt it wasn’t necessary to drive an APC because he “always” gets home before dark.

What I would Do:

I would drive an armored hummer and have an APC or two maintained just in case. But I do understand why he drove the mustang, you have to admit it would be bad-ass to drive a brand new Shelby Cobra Mustang 80 miles an hour over New York City sidewalks, I know I couldn’t resist doing that.

Hell, I would be driving tanks through shopping malls and shooting mounds of gold Rolexes with an UZI wile barbecuing lion cubs over stacks of burning 100 dollar bills.

home
home

Dr. Neville lives in a family townhouse in a city overrun by Dark seekers – and that is his only home

The Problem:

He lives in an unhardened relativity unsecure townhouse and he doesn’t have any secure safehouses in the city in case he gets caught outside after dark. Of all the places to live with thousands of monsters running around at night, a house probably isn’t the best choice. He did add some steel shutters, UV lights and IED’s to secure and defend his home. But it would have been better just to live somewhere that was already hardened and was easier to defend.

He also doesn’t have any safehouses in the city, so if he gets caught outside after dark he is basically screwed unless he can make it back to his house.

The Explanation:

This is an easy one, the townhouse he lives in is the home where he lived with his deceased wife and daughter. His mind is obviously starting to wander at this point so staying physically connected to the one thing from his life before the world ended comforts him.

What I would Do:

I would live in one of the city’s underground emergency management centers that were set up after 911. These are 5 foot thick bomb shelters with state of the art surveillance systems, food storage rooms, housing, bio-chem filtered air and fire suppression systems already set up.

I would also prepare all of the other centers so I could change living locations at will along with pre-positioning tanks and APC’s to use as mobile safehouses all around the city just incase I wasn’t able to make it back to my bunker before dark.

gun
gun

Dr. Neville carries an M-4 despite the fact it isn’t combat effective against mutable contacts with the dark seekers

The Problem:

Every time he shoots a Dark Seeker with his M-4 it doesn’t do shit, I don’t believe he kills a single one with his M-4 ever. In a city filled with guns he would have his choice of rifles so why would he continue to use an ineffective weapon?

The Explanation:

Like I said before Dr. Neville is a scientist and not a warrior, so the only weapon training he has had was with an Army issue M-4. He uses that weapon probably because it is the only rifle he knows how to use. It is also a pretty light and easy to walk around with rifle so he has also chosen it for convenience.

There is also nothing to indicate that he has been involved in any armed confrontations with the Dark Seekers before (a fact shown by how scared he is in the warehouse) so he may not even know the M-4 is a poor choice.

What I would Do:

I would carry a 12 gauge magazine fed shotgun, keep an M60 Mk 43 Mod 1 in my car and maybe an enclosed turret with a 50. cal browning on the roof. The reason I would choose a 12 gauge magazine fed shotgun is because every time Dr. Neville uses his M-4 on a Dark Seeker he is only a few feet away from one. It is hard to beat the massive amount of damage a shotgun can do at point blank range.

I would also keep a flamethrower close by because I love flamethrowers.

i-am-legend
i-am-legend

Things in the movie that are so dumb they don’t have any explanation

-He uses a grenade and it explodes like a nuclear bomb

When a hand grenade goes off it does not make a massive fireball

-He runs generators inside his house

This would kill you in about 1 hour

-He runs his generators at night and the Dark Seekers do not hear it

I have no explanation for this

-He doesn’t have any porn in his house

No way he could hold out for 3 years all alone

-He isn’t an alcoholic

Your entire family is killed in front of your eyes and then every other person on the planet dies except for the cannibal vampires that own the night - so you now live in a city filled with booze and you are not drunk 24-7? Sorry, I call BS on that one. To be fair, in the original book he is an alcoholic.

Well folks, besides the complaints about this movie from an Urban Survivalists point of view I really like this movie. It is part of the permanent DVD collection to the DV Adventurers Library.

What would you guys have done in the same situations if you were in Dr. Neville’s shoes?

I Am Legend at Amazon.com >>>

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~James G

James G is a Veteran Civilian Contractor who has worked in the Middle East and Southeast Asia for way too long. He spends his off time in his homes in Indonesia and Virginia getting drunk, shooting guns and writing poorly written articles.

URBAN SURVIVAL - BOOKS: The SAS Urban Survival Guide and Tom Brown’s City and Suburban Survival Review

These books The SAS Urban Survival Guide and Tom Brown’s City and Suburban Survival were written by two of the top “gurus” in the wilderness survival field; Tom Brown and John “Lofty” Wiseman. One was pretty good despite going off subject a bit and the other sucked mad balls.