URBAN SURVIVAL: Concealed Carrying a Large Fixed Blade Knife Daily (the CRKT Hissatsu)

CRKT-Hissatsu-Concealed
CRKT-Hissatsu-Concealed

After working in Iraq for a couple of months and making the mistake of being competent and having a fairly polite personality as opposed to the shitty security contractor douchebagnus “I am a tough bearded guy” attitude I was placed on a tedious project (because I am “responsible” and know how to write) in an area where I would not be able to carry a firearm for a while.

This had nothing to do with the threat level; it had to do with some stupid political BS that I won’t get into here. Considering that would be on a base shared by Local Nationals with the constant threat of kidnapping I sure as shit was not going to walk around unarmed.

So I decided to go way old school and arm-up with a full sized fixed-blade knife as my primary weapon that I would conceal – with an Applegate-Fairbairn gerber Mini Covert clipped to my pocket as back-up. My original plan was to rig-up an ankle rig for my Short KA-BAR but on a PX run I saw the sexy looking CRKT Hissatsu hanging on a rack so I snatched one up.

Despite its rather long length it ended up being an excellent choice for concealing, mostly due to its Zytel Sheath that is unintentionally perfect for concealing. The Zytel Sheath has a removable Zytel belt clip that can be screwed on and off the sheath with a flat head screwdriver (I used my thumbnail) that can be attached to the holes and rails anywhere on the sheath.

But the cool part is if you mount the Zytel belt clip upside-down at the top it basically becomes an inside the waistband paddle sheath that you can still loop your belt into. After hooking the Zytel belt clip on upside-down you just stuff the sheath into your pants and hook your belt through, throw on a shirt and BAM, you are now concealing a 7” CRKT Hissatsu with no visible footprint.

In this particular concealed set-up when I draw the CRKT Hissatsu it is in a reverse grip, which is fine with me as I am familiar with this style of knife fighting. The draw is a relativity smooth action of pulling up my shirt with my weak hand and gripping and drawing the knife with my strong hand.

I tried wearing it on my weak side and doing a cross-draw but it was sloppy and slow. I practiced the draw about 300 times before I started carrying it and I can now draw and cut in a single smooth motion in about 1 second.

CRKT Hissatsu sheath with the Belt clip attached the standard way
CRKT Hissatsu sheath with the Belt clip attached the standard way
CRKT Hissatsu sheath with the belt clip attached upside down for inside the waistband (IWB) concealment
CRKT Hissatsu sheath with the belt clip attached upside down for inside the waistband (IWB) concealment

The CRKT Hissatsu EDC concealed is surprisingly comfortable and unobtrusive, the one bad point is I have to wear a t-shirt under my regular shirt because the handle rubs against my side – that sort of sucks because it is one trillion degrees outside but hey, no choice.

Now for most folks reading this concealing and daily carrying a large fixed blade knife isn’t legal or practical (why not just pack a gun). But for various unforeseen reasons you may find yourself in a situation similar to mine because of your profession or environment (or if you are just strange and like to pack big-ass knives for no particular reason) so I thought I would share the info.

CRKT-Hissatsu
CRKT-Hissatsu

CRKT Hissatsu >>>> 70 Bucks and Up

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~James G Founder - Editor in Chief

James G is a Veteran Civilian Contractor who has worked in the Middle East and Southeast Asia for way too long; he has traveled to over 50 countries chasing fortune and glory. He spends his off time in Indonesia and Virginia getting drunk, shooting guns, writing poorly written articles and laughing his ass off when reading the Hissatsu description on the CRKT site.