KNIVES: CRKT M16-14 Zytel Desert Special Forces Tanto Review

CRKT M16-14 open 2
CRKT M16-14 open 2

CRKT M16-14 Zytel Desert Special Forces Tanto

The CRKT M16-14 Zytel Desert Special Forces Tanto is yet another PX knife purchase for me (damn PX was sucking me dry). The last time I was in Iraq the PX was like crack to me. Before my contract was over I ended up having to limit myself to one PX run a week after my hooch started to overflow with B-Movie DVDs, magazines I never read and a box full of knives still in the packaging. The M16-14 is a monster folder; it has a 3.875 inch long AUS 4 steel blade with an overall length of 9.25 inches when opened. It has a pretty secure teflon-plated pocket clip that is set up for right-handers and another unattached clip for southpaws that comes with screws and a small tool for that CRKT calls a Torx* tool.

You can attach both clips on at the same time if for some odd reason you would want 2 pocket clips on the same knife.

The coolest part of the CRKT M16-14 Zytel Desert Special Forces Tanto is the Desert Camo pattern Zytel scales (grips). It is a unique Desert Camo pattern that actually looks allot like stained wood. The combination of the Desert Camo scales and the light grey non-reflective bead-blast blade makes for a nice looking contrast.

And despite the scales being sort of smooth you can still keep a solid grip because of the dual Carson flippers* and the round cut outs.

CRKT M16-14 poket clip
CRKT M16-14 poket clip

CRKT M16-14 Includes an Extra Pocket Clip, Screws and a Torx* tool

The blade locks into place with a Liner Lock and a secondary lock that CRKT calls the AutoLAWKS. This is actually the only part about this knife that I didn’t like. The secondary AutoLAWKS lock pops into place automatically so when you want to close the knife you have to manually push the AutoLAWKS and the Liner Lock at the same time to close it.

Before (like 4 years ago), the secondary locking mechanism on CRKT knives were manual, if you were doing something unusually stressful with the knife you could engage if you wanted – otherwise the secondary lock would stay in the unlocked position. That’s the reason why I still carry an older CRKT, no AutoLAWKS.

CRKT M16-14 open
CRKT M16-14 open

CRKT M16-14 Closed

But this is just a personal preference and I am actually really picky when it comes to folding knives. I know many people that love the AutoLAWKS and buy CRKT folders over other brands just so they can have it. I would suggest that you try the AutoLAWKS out yourself and see if works for your needs.

I didn’t really use this knife on a daily basis so I can’t call this a Field Tested review. But one guy I worked with bought one the same time I did and he used it for over a year without any problems.

CRKT M16-14
CRKT M16-14

CRKT M16-14 Pocket Clip Side - The Lever with the Red Dot is CRKT's AutoLAWKS

The overall quality is excellent just like you would expect from CRKT, I saw no defects in the manufacturing or intended mechanical operation.

*Yet more examples of tactical companies renaming shit that already exists. Carson Flippers = blade guards, Torx Tool = Philip's Head Screwdriver

JamesGrey100X100
JamesGrey100X100

CRKT M16-14 Zytel Desert Special Forces Tanto >>> About 39 Bucks ————————————————————————————— ~James GJames G is a Veteran Civilian Contractor who has worked in the Middle East and Southeast Asia for way too long. He spends his off time in his homes in Indonesia and Virginia getting drunk, shooting guns and writing poorly written articles.